Blog

10 Oct
0

CAN Council GLBR Expands to Huron County

The CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region is expanding its Children’s Advocacy Center and Child Abuse Prevention Education programming into Huron County through an affiliation with the Huron County Child Abuse/Neglect Council. With a new office at 219 E. Huron Ave. in Bad Axe, the CAN Council will build upon Huron County’s strong history of child abuse prevention programming and serve even more local children through the addition of the CAN Council’s nationally accredited Children’s Advocacy Center.

“The CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region takes great pride in expanding our services to protect Huron County’s children,” said Emily Yeager, President/CEO of CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region. “Huron County Child Abuse/Neglect Council Board members care deeply for their community and have entrusted our CAN Council with enhancing their efforts. Just as we do for the children of Arenac, Bay and Saginaw counties, we’ll work tirelessly to secure an end to child abuse and neglect for the children of Huron County.”

Sexually or physically abused children, or those who’ve witnessed violence, recount their experience to a specially trained forensic interviewer at the CAN Council’s Children’s Advocacy Centers. Observing the interview are all parties who need to hear the child’s disclosure: the prosecutor, law enforcement and children’s protective service workers. The child tells of his abuse to one person, at one place, just one time – minimizing the trauma of reliving the details. Meanwhile, non-offending caregivers are supported through the process and receive referrals for counseling during the investigation and beyond.

“This affiliation will help us further protect the children of Huron County and offer more services to families as we continue to make a difference in the lives of these at-risk children,” said Huron County Prosecuting Attorney Tim Rutkowski. “We expect the Children’s Advocacy Center will provide another effective resource for all of law enforcement in the successful prosecution of child abuse and neglect cases.”

Erinn Mausolf, President of the Huron County Child Abuse/Neglect Council, said she is pleased to partner with an organization with well-established policies and procedures, programs and opportunities for growth. “The CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region offers all that, not to mention the solid, positive presence that they currently have throughout the region,” she said. “We are excited to bring all of those opportunities to Huron County – especially to our littlest residents.” 

 Join the CAN Council for an Open House to celebrate the expansion from 2 – 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29 beginning at Raymond James Financial Services at 1 E. Huron Ave. in Bad Axe, located down the street from the new CAN Council office. Light refreshments will be served, and an overview of CAN Council programming will be provided. Guests will then travel by golf cart or on foot to the new CAN Council office at 219 E. Huron Ave. in Bad Axe for a guided tour. The event will conclude with a 6 p.m. program at the new CAN Council office.

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20 Nov
0

More Than a Bruise? How to Stop Child Abuse and Neglect

What do you think of when you think of an abused child? The quintessential child with a black eye usually appears in everyone’s mind when asked this question. And yes, while physical abuse is child abuse, it is not the only form of abuse that a child could suffer from. All types of abuse or neglect leave marks, and some of these marks may be physical and some may be emotional—but both can have long lasting effects in a child’s life. By understanding what types of abuse there are, you may be able to recognize these marks and get these children the help they deserve.
Contrary to some beliefs, words can hurt—and when directed at a child, emotional abuse can severely damage a child’s mental health or social development. Children experiencing emotional abuse may seem excessively withdrawn, fearful or anxious about doing something wrong. Children experiencing this form of abuse can also show extreme behaviors, from being aggressive, demanding and extremely compliant.
Another very common type of child abuse is child neglect. This is defined as a pattern of failing to provide a child with basic needs, whether it be adequate food, clothing, hygiene or supervision. This form of abuse is not always easy to spot, however there are signs you can look for. Children experiencing this form of abuse can appear to have bad hygiene, their clothes can be ill-fitting or inappropriate for the weather. Children may also have untreated illnesses or physical injuries.
Physical abuse involves the physical harm or injury to a child. Children experiencing physical abuse will have frequent injuries and unexplained bruises, welts or cuts. When not visible, these injuries may be covered by inappropriate clothing—such as a child who is wearing a long-sleeved shirt on a hot day. These children may also shy away from touch, flinch at sudden movements, appear afraid to go home, and they may always be watchful or “on alert” as if they are waiting for something to happen to them.
Sexual abuse is a very complicated form of abuse. Sexual abuse doesn’t necessarily involve body contact. For example, a child may be experiencing sexual abuse by being exposed to sexual situations or materials that are sexually abusive, Children experiencing this form of abuse display knowledge of sexual acts well past their age level, and may even exhibit seductive behavior. These children may also make strong efforts to a specific person or run away from their home.
Understand, regardless of the type of abuse, the result is serious harm. There are ways to help and it is normal to have some reservations or worries about reporting child abuse. If you suspect a child is being abused, it is critical that you report it—and continue to report each incident of abuse that occurs after the first report. It may seem daunting and it may seem like your reports are not making a difference, but what you must remember is that every report you make—you are creating a snapshot of what is going on in the family. This will allow child welfare workers to better understand how to help the child. And remember, the more information you can provide, the better chance you are giving to that child in getting the help they deserve.

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16 Oct
0

What is a CASA? An Inside Look at Court Appointed Special Advocates

What is a CASA? An Inside Look at Court Appointed Special Advocates

 

There is a saying, “volunteers do not necessarily have the time; they just have the heart.”  Giving back to your community and the world is a fulfilling endeavor.  People who volunteer do it for a variety of reasons.  Volunteering offers them the chance to give something back to the community or make a difference to the people around them.  It also provides an opportunity to develop new skills or build on existing experience and knowledge.  And these are the exact reasons why people become CASA volunteers.

 

 

What is CASA? 

CASA’s are Court Appointed Special Advocates that are appointed by judges to watch over and advocate for abused and neglected children.  It is because of the help of CASA’s that these children do not get lost in the overburdened legal and social service system or languish in inappropriate group or foster homes. Volunteers stay with each case until it is closed and the child is placed in a safe, permanent home. For many abused children, their CASA volunteer will be the one constant adult presence in their lives.

 

How can you become a CASA?

CASA welcomes and encourages all people from all cultures and professions, and of all ethnic and educational backgrounds. And unlike most volunteer agencies, CASA has no required special background or education because once you are accepted into the program, you will receive all necessary training in courtroom procedures, social services, the juvenile justice system and the special needs of abused and neglected children.  The only requirements to become a volunteer is (1) you must be 21 years old, (2) you must be willing to complete necessary background checks, provide references and participate in an interview, (3) you must complete a minimum of 30 hours of pre-service training, (4) you need to be available for court appearances, with advance notice, and (5) you must willing to commit to the CASA program until your first case is closed.

 

Why should you volunteer?

Becoming a CASA volunteer is an investment of time, energy and heart.  Winston Churchill once said, “You make a living by what you get. You make a life by what you give.”  Just imagine the life you can make for yourself by volunteering your time to these children.  Not only that—but imagine the life you can make for these children by volunteering your time.  By opening your heart to these children and volunteering, you not only automatically achieved greatness by giving yourself to a cause for nothing in return, but you have succeeded in providing a sense of safety in the lives of abused and neglected children.

 

 

 

This blog article was written and published by Thrive Social LLC www.thrivesocialmi.com

 

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15 Oct
0

Introducing Our New CASA Director – Emily Yeager

Introducing Our New CASA Director – Emily Yeager

Please allow us to take this opportunity to introduce the new CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) program director, Emily Yeager.  The position offers new and exciting challenges, all of which Emily is looking forward to. Prior to becoming the director, Emily volunteered as a CASA for 5 years. As such, Emily understands and treasures the gifts of time and dedication that every CASA volunteer contributes to the program.  Coming in the wake of the exceptional leadership of CASA’s prior director Randy Roberts, Emily is committed to securing permanent & loving homes for the children of our region.

 

 

 

 

This blog article was written and published by Thrive Social LLC www.thrivesocialmi.com

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19 Nov
0

CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region

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19 Oct
0

CASA: A voice children can count on

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